ASHP InterSections ASHP InterSections

March 17, 2017

Residency Match Day 2017

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL WHO MATCHED during Phase I of the residency Match! If you didn’t match in the first round, please plan to participate in Phase II, as there are still a number of unfilled positions at excellent programs all across the country.

This year’s Match was another remarkable success. There were 5,752 applicants this year for 4,592 residency positions. Of those total positions, 3,750 are now filled with the remainder to be filled in Phase II of the Match. It should be noted that over the last five years residency positions have increased by 1,594.

It is wonderful to see such incredible interest in residency training and how the profession is responding to the increased demand by adding new positions. Residency training is an opportunity for pharmacists to further distinguish themselves as the medication experts on the patient care team, and expand their role in overall patient care.

ASHP, under the leadership of former CEO Dr. Joseph A. Oddis, created the concept of residency training and began accrediting programs 55 years ago. ASHP’s leadership in this area planted the seed for the formation of clinical pharmacy practice. Today, residency training and clinical pharmacy are more important than ever, and patients everywhere are benefiting from these important advances in pharmacy practice.

PGY2 ambulatory care residencies have experienced dramatic growth in recent years. Two years ago, there were 83 residency programs in ambulatory care; today there are 137 programs. Compared to last year, PGY2 residency programs in the areas of emergency medicine, infectious disease, and psychiatric care have also expanded rapidly.

The significant increase in the number of PGY2 residencies indicates that the market is demanding highly trained pharmacists for specialty areas of practice. In addition, the rising support for provider status at the state and national levels, as well as other changes to the healthcare landscape, is creating a demand for more residency programs.

Participating in residency programs is a win-win for you, your patients, and for the profession. I know that all of you as new PGY1 and PGY2 residents will rise up to meet the many challenges of completing a residency, and the experience will prepare you to practice at a higher level as a vital member of an interprofessional team.

Know that regardless of where you practice — whether in an ambulatory clinic, hospital, or other patient care setting — ASHP is your professional home as a patient care provider. Please plan to continue to read and contribute to AJHP Residents Edition. ASHP is the only organization with this exceptional peer-reviewed platform for pharmacy residents, and its success is fully attributed to you and the great work you will be doing as a resident. During your residency, keep up with best practices in research by viewing the ASHP Foundation’s The Essentials of Practice-Based Research. Please also make sure to stay involved in the ASHP New Practitioners Forum, which provides a multitude of resources and opportunities, including in-depth information about preparing for career transitions.

Again, congratulations to all of you, and good luck in your residency. I look forward to seeing you at the ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting and Exhibition in Orlando in December!

Sincerely,

Paul

March 18, 2016

Residency Match Day 2016

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL who matched during the first of two residency Matches! For those who did not match in the First Match, please plan to participate in the Second Match, as there are still a number of unfilled positions at excellent programs for you to take advantage of.

The Match this year was another great success, with 3,940 individuals matching with residency programs. The number of residency programs continues to grow, with another 322 residency positions added to the 2016 Match. It is ASHP’s explicit goal to continue to work with residency programs and the profession to increase the number of residency positions in the years to come.

It is fantastic to see the growing interest in residency training as well as the demand for residency-trained pharmacists. Residency training has been a powerful way to help position pharmacists as knowledgeable and credible leaders on the patient care team. It has also helped pharmacists take on even greater responsibility for medication therapy management and overall patient care.

I am still amazed when I reflect on the vision that leaders like ASHP’s former CEO Dr. Joseph A. Oddis had for the profession when ASHP created the concept of residency training more than 50 years ago. I believe it is safe to say that residency training was a major driver in the evolution and advancement of pharmacy as a clinical and patient-oriented profession. We should all be thankful to those early ASHP leaders who acted on their vision for the profession many decades before residency training was in such high demand.

I know that all of you as new PGY1 and PGY2 residents will take every opportunity offered to you during this exciting and very rigorous year of training that you are about to embark on. The experience will likely be among the more challenging in your career; however, the fruits of your labor will pay great dividends in terms of the outcomes you are able to help your patients achieve and the contributions you will make as a vital member of the interprofessional team. Further, the leadership and interpersonal skills you will gain during your training will help you to be not only a leader in the profession, but also a strong advocate of the patients you serve.

Please know that regardless of where you practice — whether in an ambulatory clinic, hospital, or other patient care setting — ASHP is your professional home as a patient care provider. Also, as a resident, please plan to continue to read and contribute to AJHP Residents Edition. ASHP is the only organization with this exceptional peer-reviewed platform for pharmacy residents, and its success is fully attributed to you and the great work you will be doing as a resident. Please also make sure to stay involved in the ASHP New Practitioners Forum, which provides a multitude of resources and opportunities for you to be involved in ASHP.

Again, congratulations to all of you, and good luck in your residency. I look forward to seeing you at the ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting in Las Vegas in December!

Paul

 

# # #

November 12, 2015

Future Pharmacy Leaders Making a Difference Today

Bryan C. McCarthy, Jr., Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS

Bryan C. McCarthy, Jr., Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS

WHEN BRYAN C. McCARTHY, JR., Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS, and David P. Reardon, Pharm.D., BCPS, first met at the Minnesota Pharmacy Residency Research Forum in 2010, they realized that they had the same enthusiasm for pharmacy and the same desire to change the profession for the better.

What they didn’t know was that over the next three years, they would dive into the world of publications management and dedicate thousands of hours to an effort that would give pharmacy residents a powerful way to share their research: The Journal of Health-System Pharmacy Residents (JHPR), now AJHP Residents Edition.

A Winding Road to a Different Future

Dr. McCarthy, now interim director of ambulatory care pharmacy services at the University of Chicago Medicine and program director of the newly established PGY1-2 pharmacy administration residency, graduated from the University of Rhode Island (URI) College of Pharmacy. He then landed in Minneapolis as Hennepin County Medical Center’s first PGY1/PGY2 pharmacy administration resident. However, Dr. McCarthy almost didn’t have a residency to go to in the first step of his career path. That’s because he had interned in two settings, CVS and South County Hospital in Narragansett, R.I., which would have sent him down another career path entirely.

“The URI College of Pharmacy program is largely a community pharmacy-driven curriculum, attributable in part to the CVS brand influence in the college and area,” said Dr. McCarthy. “It’s also near the ocean without many large academic medical centers or hospitals nearby, so internship opportunities tended toward community practice or long-term care.”

Though the experiences with CVS and South County were valuable, Dr. McCarthy sought more, and his preceptors encouraged him in his quest. One arranged a meeting between Dr. McCarthy and AstraZeneca Regional Clinical Science Manager Raymond Mastriani, Pharm.D., M.B.A. Dr. Mastriani assumed a mentoring role and suggested that a residency would serve Dr. McCarthy well. However, by that point, residency applications were already due.

When he later found himself unmatched, Dr. McCarthy sent emails to the 150 hospitals with open residency positions. Three responded, including Hennepin, which had filled the position he was inquiring about but had just received funding for its pharmacy administration residency.

“They were impressed that I had exposure to profit-and-loss statements and medication utilization evaluations, and I wouldn’t have had that exposure if my rotation preceptors hadn’t been so flexible with my interests,” Dr. McCarthy said. “I’m a firm believer that everything happens for a reason, and my landing at Hennepin is a testament to that.”

David P. Reardon, Pharm.D., BCPS

David P. Reardon, Pharm.D., BCPS

Dr. Reardon, now a solid organ transplant clinical pharmacist at Yale-New Haven Hospital, arrived in Minneapolis with slightly more breathing room, as he had been matched with Mayo Clinic Health System at Mankato for a PGY1 pharmacy practice residency. But even that was a bit of a surprise.

Not only had Dr. Reardon decided to apply for matching “at the 11th hour,” but he was also already on the path to retail pharmacy, having worked as a pharmacy technician for a Keaveny Drug store and interned at two Wal-Mart pharmacies.

“I didn’t have a lot of hospital experience, and suddenly I was at one of the top hospitals in the world,” Dr. Reardon said. “It shows what can happen when you take yourself out of your comfort zone.”

Diving into the World of Clinical Publishing

While completing his residency, Dr. McCarthy also pursued a master of science in social and administrative sciences. The residency put him in a position to notice an unmet need in pharmacy, and his work on his master’s put him in a position to find a solution.

“As part of the accreditation process for pharmacy residents, you have to write a manuscript, but I quickly found that many of the high-profile pharmacy journals aren’t publishing a lot of resident research,” Dr. McCarthy said. “Since there are more than 1,000 residents in hundreds of residency programs in the U.S., I wondered where all of their manuscripts were going.”

Dr. McCarthy said that academic publishing models came up often in casual conversations with fellow students and professors in his master’s program, and one night everything came together in a eureka moment.

“I was sitting at my desk one night doing homework, and it hit me that we could have a magazine for pharmacy residents perhaps called Resident Rx, and later expand that to Resident MD, Resident RN, and so on,” said Dr. McCarthy. “Then the name—Journal of Health-System Pharmacy Residents—came into my head and that was it.”

Collaborate. Network. Go out and experience whatever you can experience, and if someone gives you an opportunity, the answer should always be ‘yes.’

After mulling it over for a month, Dr. McCarthy set about making arrangements. “It was really like a full-time job,” he said.

Meanwhile, Dr. McCarthy and Dr. Reardon’s friendship had grown from simply networking to recreational get-togethers such as ice-fishing and nights out in Minneapolis. In July 2011, Dr. Reardon moved to Boston to complete a PGY2 critical care residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, but the two met up again at the ASHP Leaders Conference in October 2011, where they decided to work together on the journal.

“I knew I needed David’s help. I just didn’t know exactly how yet, so we started off by tag-teaming it from the Leaders Conference,” Dr. McCarthy said.

“Bryan identified the niche for the journal, and as he told me about it, the wheels started spinning,” Dr. Reardon said. “How big could it be? What would be the scope? Who will be involved? How do you get it going? What is the ultimate goal? We wanted residents to have a place to publish their work, but also a place where everyone, not just residents, could read what is being done at the resident level.”

From there, it was a matter of Dr. McCarthy and Dr. Reardon rolling up their sleeves and digging in. The journal’s website went live in December 2011, with options for submissions, subscriptions, and requests for volunteers to be on the editorial board. The duo reached out to residency program directors and deans of colleges of pharmacies in a massive, targeted campaign to raise awareness.

The journal took off. It received 200 submissions in the first year alone, and more than 200 in the first half of the second year. But by the end of the second volume, the demands of publishing began to outstrip the time and resources Dr. McCarthy, Dr. Reardon, and the editorial board had to devote to it.

“We started to wonder how much more of this we could actually do ourselves,” Dr. Reardon said.

By the second half of 2014, they had their answer. With their careers blossoming, it was time to turn to an organization with the resources to meet the demands of publishing a quarterly peer-reviewed journal: ASHP.

Transitioning to a New Paradigm

Through a series of calls at the end of 2014, Dr. McCarthy, Dr. Reardon, and ASHP staff ironed out the details of the transition. In June, ASHP published the first issue of what is now the AJHP Residents Edition, published quarterly as an online supplement to AJHP.

Dr. McCarthy and Dr. Reardon now serve on AJHP’s editorial board, working with Daniel J. Cobaugh, Pharm.D., DABAT, FAACT, editor in chief. Papers that originally appeared in JHPR will be republished in AJHP Residents Edition to ensure that they remain in the published literature and are indexed in PubMed along with all new submissions.

“It’s a win-win situation,” said Carol Wolfe, ASHP’s vice president of publications and drug information systems. “Over the years, we’ve received many more resident papers at AJHP than we could accommodate. AJHP Residents Edition is the perfect showcase for this great work, allowing residents to contribute to the academic literature while gaining the exposure and attention they need as they advance in their careers.

AJHP Residents Edition also aligns perfectly with ASHP’s longstanding leadership in advancing residency training and supporting residents, preceptors, and program directors.”

Wolfe had high praise for Drs. McCarthy and Reardon. “It’s quite impressive how quickly they launched a successful publication, all while completing their residencies and then embarking on their careers,” she noted. “They represent the leadership trajectory of many pharmacy residents, spanning clinical, administrative, acute, and ambulatory care roles.”

As he looks toward the future, Dr. Reardon wanted to share some hard-won advice with current pharmacy residents.

“Realize that this is your profession. If there is something you don’t like, change it. If there is a direction you think the profession needs to take, it’s your responsibility to make it happen,” he said. “Collaborate. Network. Go out and experience whatever you can experience, and if someone gives you an opportunity, the answer should always be ‘yes.’ ”

Dr. McCarthy couldn’t agree more. “There’s really no secret to this. If you want to accomplish something, you can. It’s a matter of the sacrifice you’re willing to make. Through AJHP Residents Edition, more people can learn of the things you do, so take advantage of the opportunities you have. You’re only a resident once.”

–By Terri D’Arrigo

Editor’s Note: Interested in publishing in AJHP Residents Edition? See the links below.

Author Guidelines: AJHP Residents Edition

Residency Research Tips – ASHP Foundation

AJHP Research Fundamentals Series

May 22, 2015

Taking AJHP to the Next Level

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

I AM DELIGHTED to update you on exciting efforts to transform AJHP and to outline the roadmap to achieving that transformation that will unfold over the next several months. As we build on the extraordinary legacy of exceptional efforts of AJHP’s past editors in chief C. Richard Talley, William A. Zellmer, George P. Provost, and Donald E. Francke, we are moving quickly to ramp up delivery of new cutting-edge content, expand reader engagement, and introduce innovations to enhance the print and digital experience.

In January 2015, Dr. Daniel Cobaugh became the fifth editor in chief of AJHP in its 72-year history. He brings his experiences as a researcher, author, and pharmacy leader to the editor role. In the March 15, 2015, issue of the Journal, Dan described his vision for ensuring that AJHP is recognized for its relevance and impact in the complex 21st century healthcare system.

I hope you’ve noticed the enhancements to the AJHP editorial page that reflect Dan’s vision; they are really extraordinary! When the next table of contents arrives in your email box or the print version of the Journal arrives at home, turn to the editorial page to read thoughtful scientific, clinical, patient care-oriented, and public health discussions on some of the most complex topics that confront us as we work to provide the best care for our patients.

You will also see a new approach to cutting-edge clinical content as well as practice advancement topics. Watch for rapidly developed, high-impact coverage in areas like ambulatory care, precision medicine, specialty pharmacy, pharmacists’ prescribing activities, and leadership innovations.

I am especially excited about the new AJHP Residents Edition that will publish its first issue on June 1, 2015. This quarterly web-based supplement to AJHP will provide a unique forum for pharmacy residents and recent residency graduates to showcase projects carried out during their residency training.

AJHP Residents Edition was established following ASHP’s acquisition of JHPR® (Journal of Health-System Pharmacy Residents®), a well-known and respected digital journal for pharmacy residents. The first issue will include five original articles as well as seven reprints of JHPR articles. You will also notice some additional changes with AJHP Residents Edition, including author photos, profiles, and video interviews.

To hear more about AJHP Residents Edition, be sure to listen to the AJHP Voices podcast interview with the founding JHPR editors, Drs. Bryan McCarthy and David Reardon. Also read Drs. McCarthy and Reardon’s accompanying June 1 AJHP editorial in which they describe how a passion for pharmacy residency training drove their desire to establish JHPR and their vision for AJHP Residents Edition.

Our inclusion of photos, videos, and author profiles in AJHP Residents Edition is the first of many steps in our work to increase engagement of readers and authors with AJHP content. You should already be seeing increased social media activity as readers, authors, and ASHP staff share AJHP information and engage in conversations on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and ASHP Connect. Please be a part of the dialogue through social media as engagement with AJHP continues to increase.

When you read the July 1st issue of AJHP, pay special attention to the results of the ASHP National Survey of Pharmacy Practice. You’ll see the article is accompanied by an enhanced data supplement that reveals trends in safety-related technology use by hospital size over the last six years. This is a precursor to the Journal’s future data visualization efforts. You can access these data visuals using the Augmented Reality app with the print issue or by clicking on the data supplement link in the electronic version.

Watch for a contemporary cover-to-cover redesign of AJHP in early 2016. The new design will reflect AJHP’s core values while signaling the Journal’s accelerated evolution as a high impact, customer-friendly 21st century biomedical publication. Perspectives from an array of ASHP members and other stakeholders will be included during the redesign process to ensure an AJHP experience that engages and meets the needs of the broad array of pharmacist patient care providers that comprise ASHP’s membership.

As Dan said in his March 15th editorial, “The integration of technology must carry on such that the Journal’s content continues to be offered on platforms that meet readers’ evolving preferences.” We want you, with a single click, to have access to the AJHP content that is critical to providing the best care for your patients and advancing your practice.

Recently, over 1,500 ASHP members participated in a satisfaction survey of AJHP readers and authors. The survey results will be used by members, the AJHP editors, and other ASHP staff as we undertake a strategic planning process to chart the Journal’s course over the next three to five years. I cannot overstate how important this member feedback will be in ensuring that AJHP is recognized for its relevance and impact in the complex 21st-century healthcare system.

I hope you are as excited as I am about all of the incredible changes that are occurring with AJHP. If you have any suggestions as we move forward, feel free to contact the AJHP editors at ajhp@ashp.org.

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