ASHP InterSections ASHP InterSections

August 15, 2016

In an Anticoagulation Clinic, Unrelated Interventions Abound

Melanie Boros, Pharm.D., BCPS, meets with a patient at Cleveland Clinic Akron General's outpatient anticoagulation clinic.

Melanie Boros, Pharm.D., BCPS, meets with a patient at Cleveland Clinic Akron General’s outpatient anticoagulation clinic.

IT’S WELL KNOWN that when pharmacists guide anticoagulation treatment, patient outcomes are better. International normalized ratio (INR) levels are within the target range more of the timei and hemorrhage rates are lowerii, compared to the usual care.

But what about the care pharmacists provide in anticoagulation clinics that is not directly related to the primary purpose of the visit?

A new study published in AJHP found that pharmacists offer significant additional care outside the purview of anticoagulation by helping patients avoid adverse events and receive timely treatment for other health concerns, and by improving their continuity of careiii.

Med Rec Reveals Important Picture of Patient Health

Michael Hicho, Pharm.D., BCPS

Michael Hicho, Pharm.D., BCPS

“Pharmacists, whether they’re in the anticoagulation clinic or in any other setting, can make a significant positive impact on patients’ care if they take advantage of each interaction they have with a patient,” said primary author Michael Hicho, Pharm.D., BCPS, who was a PGY1 pharmacy practice resident at Akron General Medical Center, Akron, Ohio, at the time of the study. Dr. Hicho is currently Inpatient Clinical Manager, Pharmacy Service, at Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland.

“As our findings show, these interactions may not necessarily always involve starting, stopping, or adjusting a medication but can, for example, include collaboration with other healthcare providers to ensure that patients are receiving appropriate care,” he said.

Dr. Hicho drew these conclusions from a retrospective analysis of records from 5,846 pharmacist encounters with 268 patients treated at the Akron General Medical Center’s pharmacist-managed ambulatory anticoagulation clinic between January 2012 and November 2013. The clinic served patients referred by 30 physicians during the study period.

Dr. Hicho’s team classified interventions not directly related to anticoagulation into six major categories (see TABLE below) and 33 subcategories. They found that pharmacists conducted a striking 2,222 interventions not directly related to patients’ primary reasons for visiting the anticoagulation clinic. Nearly 75% of patients received four or more unrelated interventions and almost 14% received 10 or more of these interventions.

Medication reconciliation was the most common intervention not directly related to anticoagulation. During those interactions, pharmacists identified 1,591 medication list discrepancies, including inaccuracies in the medication list for 89% of these instances.

They also found 107 instances in which a patient was taking his or her medication incorrectly and an additional 74 cases in which there was a possibility a patient may have been taking his or her medication incorrectly.

The Continuity of Care Equation

According to Dr. Hicho, pharmacists helped ensure continuity of care by assessing patients’ overall health, sending physicians medical information they collected, recommending primary care physician follow-up, and, in some cases, calling a physician for an immediate onsite visit or urging patients to visit the emergency department.

Amy Rybarczyk, Pharm.D., BCPS

Amy Rybarczyk, Pharm.D., BCPS

Measuring the clinical and financial value of interventions like these is difficult, said co-author Amy Rybarczyk, Pharm.D., BCPS, Pharmacotherapy Specialist in Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Akron General. “At the moment, there is no standardized method for quantifying pharmacist interventions,” said Dr. Rybarczyk, who was Dr. Hicho’s research advisor at the time of the study. “It’s hard to measure the value of ensuring that a patient gets an antibiotic for a diabetic foot infection that is detected by a pharmacist, for example. A tool like that would be beneficial for our profession to have.”

Collaborative Practice Agreement Buoyed by Findings

The team’s results were so impressive that they were included in a letter to the Ohio Legislature in support of House Bill 188, which called for an expansion of pharmacists’ services as part of collaborative practice agreements. The legislation passed in December 2015.

“We believe the comprehensive care provided to patients in our disease state management clinic helped in this effort to expand pharmacists’ clinical services,” explained Dr. Rybarczyk.

“We believe the comprehensive care provided to patients in our disease state management clinic helped in this effort to expand pharmacists’ clinical services.” — Amy Rybarczyk, Pharm.D., BCPS

Co-author Melanie Boros, Pharm.D., BCPS, Pharmacotherapy Specialist in Internal Medicine at Cleveland Clinic Akron General and Dr. Hicho’s research advisor at the time of study, suggested that one of the important takeaway messages is the trust that patients place in their pharmacists. “When we see a patient with a therapeutic INR, and there are no changes that need to be made to his or her anticoagulation regimen, we can still make a significant impact by simply clarifying what their dose of insulin should be or teaching them about appropriate use of nonprescription medicines, for example,” she said, adding that pharmacists are well-positioned to answer patients’ questions and proactively identify other health issues.

“Like our entire department, pharmacists in the clinic have always made it a priority to care for the whole patient,” she emphasized.

–By David Wild

i J Throm Thrombolysis 2011; 32:426-430
ii Pharmacotherapy 195; 15:732-739
iii AJHP Residents Issue 2016; 73 (Supp 3):S80-87


August 8, 2013

Leadership: Central to Pharmacy Practice Advancement

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

EFFECTIVE, FOCUSED LEADERSHIP AND EXECUTIVE PRESENCE are essential to driving pharmacy practice advancement, thus optimizing patient care. ASHP and the ASHP Foundation are committed to supporting pharmacists in their professional and leadership development journey to achieve this goal.

Leadership in clinical practice and effectively working collaboratively on interprofessional teams are what drives practice change. And, through a number of initiatives, ASHP and the Foundation are dedicated to assisting pharmacists across the complete spectrum of their career… from student, to new practitioner, to emerging clinical and administrative practice leaders, and, ultimately, as experienced leaders.

No other pharmacy organization has the depth and level of commitment to your practice leadership development that ASHP does. Please let me review with you this level of commitment and showcase examples of leadership development opportunities that ASHP and the Foundation are offering our members.

Pharmacy Leadership Academy

The Pharmacy Leadership Academy (PLA) has been in existence for five years, and nearly 400 practitioners have completed this transformational leadership development program. The Academy is helping to launch talented new clinical practice leaders and assisting other established leaders in reaching new heights in their careers.

At the Foundation’s ASHP Summer Meeting Donor Breakfast, I heard three pharmacists speak about their life-changing PLA experiences. I was touched and thrilled to hear their heartfelt stories of professional success, and I suggest that you read their inspiring messages and view the video on the Foundation’s website.

What impressed me about the graduates’ messages was their self-confidence, poise, passion, and full commitment to their patients and to leading our profession to new heights. This month, 68 pharmacists began the year-long, distance-based PLA program. They are poised to reach new heights in practice leadership.

If you are interested in catapulting your career, I encourage you to consider enrolling in the next class. In addition, directors and chief pharmacy officers should also identify members of their staff who are primed for success and enroll them in the 2014 class.

leadersINNOVATION Masters Series

ASHP and the Foundation also offer the leadersINNOVATION Masters Series, which consists of two, six-week distance-learning programs: “Developing Transformational Leadership Skills” and “Designing Transformational Change: Strategy and Tactics.”

This leadership development series is an excellent option for pharmacists who may not be able to fulfill a year-long commitment, or who seek a program before the start of the next PLA class. The leadersINNOVATION Masters Series begins August 18. Courses position practitioners to deal effectively with rapid changes in the health care environment and to position pharmacy for the type of transformational change that can expand and advance pharmacy practice.

The series is ideally suited for an emerging leader, a recent pharmacy resident graduate, or for an established leader needing guidance on how to move pharmacy practice to the next level. It also may be exactly what you need for your own professional development or what you have been seeking for one or more of your staff.

leadersEDGE Webinar Series

The new leadersEDGE Webinar Series is another leadership development program that will be launched by the Center for Health-System Pharmacy Leadership in September 2013.

This 90-minute program will address major, cutting-edge leadership challenges facing pharmacy practitioners in health systems. The first program will address the current state of the “Business of Pharmacy.” Webinar faculty will focus on the critical capability and capacity necessary to transform practice. It is the perfect program for pharmacists interested in staying in front of major leadership issues facing our profession.

Opportunities for Students, Residents

At ASHP, we believe that our student pharmacists and pharmacy residents are the lifeblood of our profession.

Pharmacy students face a competitive environment when they graduate and are looking for opportunities to develop and ultimately showcase their leadership talents. ASHP has a host of opportunities through the Student Societies of Health-System Pharmacy, Leadership Speakers BureauASHP Student Leadership Award ProgramStudent Leadership Development Workshops, and the national Clinical Skills Competition.

The future of our profession is in the hands of our pharmacy students and pharmacy residents. ASHP remains committed to providing leadership opportunities for them, including the Visiting Leaders Program, which has been developed explicitly for pharmacy residents.

Showcasing ASHP’s Many Leadership Offerings

During my many years working in hospitals and health systems, I relied upon ASHP, as my professional organization, to assist me in that journey at all steps along the way. It was a challenge for me to keep up with the many offerings of ASHP, and I know many of you face the same challenge.

That is why, at this critical juncture, I am taking the time to showcase ASHP’s commitment to our leadership development programs. Please take the time to share this message, and have your colleagues or your staff members review these fantastic program opportunities.

Feel free to share your thoughts with me about your leadership development needs, and remember that focused and effective leadership is central to pharmacy practice advancement at the bedside, in the pharmacy, in the clinic, and in the administrative office.

July 22, 2013

Interprofessional Collaboration: ASHP’s Response to the AMA

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

In June of this year, the American Medical Association (AMA) passed a resolution that caused concern among many of us.  At first glance, it’s no wonder why the policy gave us pause, as it states that “a pharmacist who makes inappropriate queries on a physician’s rationale behind a prescription, diagnosis, or treatment plan is interfering with the practice of medicine.”

While this statement seems to throw up a barrier to the good, productive collaborative relationships that best benefit patients–and that pharmacists, physicians, and patients have all grown to appreciate–it’s important to look at what was at its root: this nation’s drug abuse problem.  The AMA’s statement is a response to the efforts of some pharmacies in light of the federal government’s stepped-up enforcement to prevent diversion and better control the epidemic of prescription drug abuse.

Certain pharmacies, in response to enhanced scrutiny and enforcement efforts by the Drug Enforcement Administration, are calling and faxing to verify the legitimacy of every controlled substance prescription before filling. The burden this has placed on some physicians’ offices gave rise to this new AMA policy.

I recently wrote a letter to the CEO of the AMA that stressed the long history of collaboration that exists between pharmacists and physicians in hospitals, health systems, and ambulatory clinics. My letter confirmed that ASHP would be pleased to work with the AMA and other stakeholders to find solutions to the broader problem of prescription drug abuse, which ideally would include more effective communications and interprofessional collaboration among pharmacists, physicians, other health care providers, policymakers, and law enforcement.

The nature of today’s health care delivery system depends on professional collaboration to make sure our patients are getting the best health care possible.  Over the course of my 35-plus years in practice, and here at ASHP, I’ve seen firsthand how that collaboration has grown exponentially,  and is now widespread, not only in our nation’s hospitals and clinics, but with our community pharmacy partners.

And, indeed, we hear the same from our physician colleagues. In fact, Richard Pieters, M.D., the physician who wrote the draft for the AMA resolution, described his working relationship with pharmacists as “excellent” in an interview with Pharmacy Practice News. He added that “pharmacists are very valuable members of the team.”

Pieters, who is a radiation oncologist at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center and president-elect of the Massachusetts Medical Society, went on to state that, as a physician who is board-certified in hospice and palliative medicine, he finds pharmacists to be “fantastic resources.”

With a strong commitment to getting to the right issues in the right ways, pharmacists and physicians can both be part of the solution to our nation’s epidemic of prescription drug abuse in a way that encourages the interprofessional collaboration that best serves our patients.

July 15, 2013

West Penn Clinic Successfully Treating Underserved Patients

Pharmacists at West Penn are a key part of the transition-of-care team as indigent patients move from inpatient care to care at the Health and Wellness Clinic.

PITTSBURGH KNOWS A THING OR TWO about comebacks. The Rust Belt capital suffered big losses when the steel industry collapsed in the 1980s, but returned to prosperity with a diversified economy. The West Penn Hospital also faced its own budgetary crisis a few years ago, after peaking in patient volume in 2008.

In 2010, we were forced to significantly downsize and reduce patient care services due to the financial difficulties of our parent organization. After an acquisition and two years of rebuilding and revitalization, we have turned things around with the reopening of a transformed emergency department, an increase in patient beds, technology upgrades, and the biggest transformation yet: the opening of a “new concept” health and wellness clinic in downtown Pittsburgh.

The West Penn Hospital Health and Wellness Clinic, which opened in February 2013, helped us to re-establish our reputation as a cornerstone of medical care in Pittsburgh and the surrounding Bloomfield-Garfield community. Funded 100 percent by proceeds from the hospital’s 340B drug discount program, the clinic provides critical medical services to underinsured and otherwise underserved patients.

Jennifer Davis, Pharm.D.

Jennifer Davis, Pharm.D.

Since its inception, the pharmacy services department has been a driving force behind West Penn’s 340B program.  As the system director for outpatient pharmacy services, I’ve taken the lead in the overall operations of the new clinic. We run the clinic as efficiently as possible, saving time and resources by using existing space and personnel, including on-staff physicians. The funds generated by our 340B program pay for medications that patients might not otherwise be able to afford and for the cost of staffing the clinic.

As a 340B-covered entity, West Penn Hospital contracts with local pharmacies to fill prescriptions using inventory purchased by the hospital at the 340B price. Through this contract pharmacy network, we provide discounted medications to uninsured patients and generate much-needed supplemental revenue from prescriptions covered by insurance.  The revenue, in turn, is used to cover the cost of the downtown Health and Wellness Clinic as well as costs associated with other uncompensated care.

Clinic Grows, Hospital Readmission Shrinks

Physicians at the clinic see uninsured and underserved patients weekly, and we expect to see more patients as word spreads. With funding generated by the 340B program, we help patients offset the costs of their medications. They literally benefit twice from the same 340B savings—patients now have increased access to care and their prescription costs are lower.

As with most hospitals today, readmission is a hot topic at West Penn. Pharmacists at the clinic help keep patients from using the hospital’s emergency department by providing disease management, medicine adjustments, and lab monitoring services. In addition, we receive prescription compliance data from our 340B program administrator to help clinicians monitor the patients who use the program. In February alone, the clinic saw 52 patients. We were also able to hire a full-time receptionist. By year’s end, the clinic hopes to see 800 patients.

Transitioning to Better Care

At the clinic, we are strong advocates for the “transition of care” program, which helps patients use the wellness clinic and Allegheny General Hospital (AGH) Apothecary (one of the hospital’s 340B contract pharmacies) and other local contract pharmacies. This program helps to ensure the coordination and continuity of care as patients transfer between different locations or different levels of care within the same location.

Another service we offer at the clinic is bedside medication counseling at discharge and seeing these patients at the clinic for medication management. AGH Apothecary fills prescriptions as needed. Pharmacists also provide post- hospitalization follow-up for patients who are unable to see their regular doctor.

Key Partners in Setting up the Clinic

With the health and wellness clinic, we have made the best possible use of the hospital’s 340B savings. Starting the clinic, however, took planning, resourcefulness, hard work, and a partnership with a contact pharmacy administrator, Wellpartner, to manage the program.

Wellpartner has expertise in creating custom 340B retail pharmacy networks that include both chains and independents.  Our network is well balanced with the right geographical coverage, which helps increase 340B program utilization.

The hospital first implemented its 340B contract pharmacy program in 2011, after a local pharmacist noted that uninsured and underinsured patients from the hospital’s Joslin Diabetes Center could no longer pay for their medications. Currently, West Penn’s 340B program uses 29 contract pharmacies, filling more than 8,800 prescriptions in 2012.

I also credit the hospital’s C-suite for helping to get the clinic started. They were huge champions for us, and I believe that with strong C-suite support any hospital can implement such a program.

The economy has caused plenty of setbacks for us and for people in need throughout our service area.  But the West Penn Hospital Health and Wellness Clinic proves that with hard work and ingenuity, positive results are possible, even in the worst of times.

–By Jennifer Davis, Pharm.D., Director of Outpatient Pharmacy Services, West Penn Health System, Pittsburgh

 

 

 

May 23, 2013

Moore Pharmacist Put Preparedness Into Action

Barbara Poe attempts to retrieve possessions from her GMC Yukon about two hours after an EF5 tornado tore through Moore, OK, on May 20. The tornado destroyed Moore Medical Center, where Poe is lead pharmacist. Photo courtesy of Darin Smith.

THE PHARMACY AT 45-BED MOORE MEDICAL CENTER in Oklahoma may be intact. On Wednesday, May 22, no one knew for sure. Moore’s former lead pharmacist, Barbara Poe, had not been able to return since she and pharmacy technician Kim Wedel left the pharmacy on May 20 in search of refuge from the oncoming tornado.

They eventually took cover under a desk in the postanesthesia care unit, using pillows and mattresses from gurneys for additional protection.

When they emerged, Poe said, “I looked to my left. Part of the building was gone.”

So, too, were the chairs that she had earlier kicked away from the desk.

And the auxiliary automated dispensing cabinet “was gone,” perhaps around the corner, Poe said.

No Place to Shelter

The maximum-strength tornado that tore through 17 miles of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area touched down at 2:45 p.m. CDT and ended at 3:35 p.m. CDT, according to the National Weather Service’s May 22 statement.

Poe, a lifelong Oklahoman, said she had been monitoring the weather since at least noon. At 1 p.m., when a local news channel’s noon broadcast ended, she had her computer display the weather radar. About half an hour later, the radar showed thunderstorms. Around 2 p.m., the meteorologists in Oklahoma City used the terms “the hook” and “well defined,” she said.

“This tornado blew up faster than any tornado I have ever seen in my life,” Poe said.

She didn’t hear the city’s tornado sirens or the hospital’s announcement of code black. Poe explained that was not unusual because of the pharmacy’s location on the first floor.

When the meteorologists instructed people to “get out of the way or get underground,” Poe said, she and Wedel left the pharmacy, which had no protective place for them.

Poe said they looked across the hall at the cafeteria and realized it was full, partly with hospital employees and partly with people from the community. Patients from the second floor had been moved to the first floor.

She said the next stop was the surgery area. The hospital did not have a basement.

After she and Wedel barricaded themselves under the desk in the postanesthesia care unit, Poe said perhaps 10 minutes passed. Then the electricity went out, something hit the building, there was a pause, and then she heard the sound of a train.

“And then,” she said, “it was as if there was a giant outside with a sledgehammer hitting the building.”

Meanwhile, Poe’s supervisor, Darin Smith, was in the incident command center at the 324-bed flagship of three-hospital Norman Regional Health System, less than 10 miles from Moore.

Smith, the health system’s assistant director for pharmacy services and performance improvement, said the group in the command center had been monitoring the path of the tornado.

Early information suggested that the tornado had not hit Moore Medical Center, Smith said. So he, his superior, who is the chief nursing officer, and the vice president responsible for the Moore campus drove together to the hospital with the goal to help the staff resume operations.

On the way, Smith said, they realized “the hospital had taken a direct strike.”

Setting Up Triage

The drive to the small hospital probably took more than an hour because traffic had backed up, he recalled. All the while, the group tried texting and calling Moore’s staff members.

“By the time we had arrived, all the patients and most of the employees, if not all of them, were already out of the building and they had set up a triage area at an adjacent building next door,” Smith said.

Vehicles lay near the southeast side of Moore Medical Center. The postanesthesia care unit, where Barbara Poe and Kim Wedel took refuge, was on this side of the facility. Photo courtesy of Darin Smith.

That building, the Moore Warren Theater, is what television viewers probably saw, he said, when they watched news footage of triage near the hospital.

No patients or staff members at Moore had injuries from the storm, the health system said.

Smith said his first sighting at the theater was of Wedel. She said Poe was OK and pointed in her general direction.

“I was quite in shock, a little bit,” he said. “I wasn’t expecting to walk up and see the building totally devastated. . . . I was expecting to be able to walk in and help Barbara and kind of get things going.”

The smell of gasoline from the destroyed vehicles and natural gas from broken pipes “was pretty overpowering,” he said. There was concern about the potential for an explosion.

In addition to the gasoline and natural gas leaks, the oxygen storage tank sitting outside the pharmacy on the hospital’s exterior was leaking. Poe said she learned of that leak when she tried to return to the pharmacy after leaving the postanesthesia care unit.

Smith said Moore’s pharmacy staff, which included a pharmacist who worked the seven-days on, seven-days off schedule opposite Poe, now reports for work at Norman Regional.

“Right now, Barbara has a lot of work to do,” he said.

Where to Begin to Pick Up the Pieces?

There are controlled substances at Moore to count and remove, Smith said. The whereabouts of the automated dispensing cabinets on the hospital’s second floor, where the nursing units had been, must be determined. Steps must be taken to close the pharmacy. Whether that closure is permanent or just temporary has not been decided, he said.

Poe, whose vehicle was damaged by the tornado, is not the only member of Smith’s staff who lost property.

The tornadoes that hit the area on Sunday destroyed a pharmacy technician’s house, Smith said. His department assistant lucked out in that her house is still standing despite the tornadoes tearing up her treed yard and damaging neighbors’ houses.

“We’ve had a tremendous outpouring” of concern from pharmacists across the country, he said. “It does give you a very good feeling of how close-knit and really how caring I think our profession is.”

On Wednesday, Poe and Smith said they were working on helping to meet the future needs of residents in Moore. Earlier in the day they had delivered albuterol inhalers, ceftriaxone injection, and a few other items that had been requested by Heart to Heart International for its mobile medical unit in Moore, Poe said.

Before choosing to work at Moore, Poe had been the pharmacy director at Norman Regional. She was a member of the ASHP Council on Administrative Affairs when it proposed the initial policy position on emergency preparedness in 1999.

Poe, who still remembers the sight of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City immediately after the bombing in 1995, said she was the council member who proposed the policy topic.

–By Cheryl Thompson; reprinted with permission from ASHP News

April 30, 2013

New Strategic Plan Points the Way Forward

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

A GOOD STRATEGIC PLAN allows us to map our future with a clear course to success. In January of this year, the ASHP Board of Directors approved a new comprehensive Strategic Plan.

This plan is a significant departure from the Leadership Agenda that it replaces because it includes and integrates all ASHP activities and operations. While the previous document focused only on professional priorities, our new Strategic Plan includes three main pillars: Our Patients and Their Care, Our Members and Partners, and Our People and Performance.

This new plan embodies our passion, our energy, and our unwavering commitment to you–our members–and the patients whom you serve.

We began the process of creating this comprehensive Strategic Plan by starting with a new vision statement for ASHP. Working with a great team of Board members, Section and Forum Executive Committee leaders, and ASHP staff at an April 2012 retreat, we strove to develop a new vision that would be bold, far-reaching and important to our members and patients.

In particular, we wanted to create a vision that is universal in focus and covers all patients in all settings across the continuum of care. I am pleased to say that our new vision statement achieves this important goal:

ASHP’s vision is that medication use will be optimal, safe and effective for all people, all of the time.

Working from our new vision statement, we turned to revising our mission. Again, we focused on pharmacists’ role in the full spectrum of individual and public health. We wanted to craft a mission statement that moved beyond medications to emphasize that, in addition to treating disease, pharmacists have an important role in improving and maintaining health. Our new mission statement, below, also sets the stage for our member pharmacists as providers caring for and following patients through their entire healthcare experience, regardless of the site of care:

The mission of pharmacists is to help people achieve optimal health outcomes. ASHP helps its members achieve this mission by advocating and supporting the professional practice of pharmacists in hospitals, health systems, ambulatory clinics, and other settings spanning the full spectrum of medication use. ASHP serves its members as their collective voice on issues related to medication use and public health.

Drawing from the vision and mission, we created ambitious strategies, goals and objectives. As I mentioned above, the Strategic Plan includes three pillars, which are short and simple, yet all-encompassing, high-level strategies:

    1. Our Patients and Their Care
    2. Our Members and Partners
    3. Our People and Performance

The first pillar focuses on the central purpose of pharmacists: improving the health of our patients throughout the entire continuum of care, including both ambulatory and acute care. The goals and objectives within this strategy provide a roadmap for how ASHP helps its members care for their patients now and in the future. They include:

  • Improving patient outcomes from medications;
  • Wellness and preventative care;
  • Advancing pharmacy practice;
  • Helping the pharmacy workforce meet patient needs;
  • Providing professional development;
  • Advocating for laws, regulations, and standards; and
  • Placing an increasing emphasis on expanding our members’ practices in clinics and other ambulatory care settings.

Examples of activities in this realm include efforts related to improving care transitions, using information technology and pharmacy technicians more effectively, advancing efforts related to the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative, ensuring an adequate supply of well-trained pharmacists, providing contemporary education and professional development, and advocating for changes in laws and regulations that give patients greater and more effective access to pharmacists.

The second pillar of our new Strategic Plan focuses on the central purpose of ASHP: our members. Members are the focus of our work and are the core of ASHP’s inspiration and reason for being. The goals and objectives of this pillar relate to how we serve our members and work with other stakeholders, including:

  • Maintaining a high level of member satisfaction,
  • Growing membership,
  • Supporting our state affiliates,
  • Engaging members through Sections and Forums,
  • Working in collaboration with our various partners in pharmacy and the broader healthcare community, and
  • Publishing timely and innovative resources.

Some examples of activities in this area include enhancing opportunities for members to participate and take leadership roles in ASHP; partnering with ASHP state affiliates on advocacy and other efforts to improve patient care; increasing the number of tools and resources to help our members best care for their patients; and fostering and growing relationships with pharmacy, medicine, nursing, consumer organizations, and others.

The third pillar focuses on a vital element to our success: our staff and organizational performance. ASHP can be proud of its strong staff team. Our staff is a critical success factor and an invaluable asset to the organization as we strive to meet and exceed our ambitious goals. This pillar’s goals include:

  • Fostering staff excellence, teamwork and innovation;
  • Ensuring a financially strong organization;
  • Maintaining effective and energized governance;
  • Effectively managing our organizational infrastructure; and
  • Fostering high-performance staff leadership.

The essence of this pillar and its related goals and objectives is that having the best staff in the business and a financially strong organization is central to the Society’s ability to continue to maintain and enhance the services that we provide to our members.

We are all very excited about the future this plan will help guide us to. We will use the Strategic Plan to direct all ASHP activites, focusing our work on the most important issues and services required by you and the patients you serve.

I encourage you to review the new ASHP Strategic Plan, share it with your colleagues, and use this plan as you engage in your own strategic planning efforts within your practice setting.

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress