ASHP InterSections ASHP InterSections

July 26, 2021

For P1s, Getting Involved with ASHP is Key to Success

Lisa Lubsch, Pharm.D., rounds with student pharmacists.

TAKE IT FROM EXPERIENCED PHARMACISTS: getting involved early on with professional organizations like ASHP is crucial to building a successful career and enjoying all that the profession has to offer.

“Engaging with ASHP as a first-year (P1) pharmacy student allows them to explore more career paths, take on leadership roles within the organization and develop skills that will benefit them in post-graduate training and throughout their careers,” said Lauren Pamulapati, Pharm.D., assistant professor at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) School of Pharmacy in Richmond.

Free Membership to P1 Students

Starting in 2020, ASHP has waived the membership fee for P1 students, making it easy for P1s to dive deeper into the field of health-system pharmacy. Members gain access to a host of resources to help them prepare for residency, investigate potential careers, and build an effective CV. Benefits like daily email briefings and podcasts also keep members abreast of pharmacy and healthcare news. Summer internship opportunities and networking and leadership possibilities can help pave the way for professional growth.

Dr. Pamulapati, who advises students and residents and serves on the ASHP Society of Student Health-System Pharmacists (SSHP) Advisory Panel, said she has found that students who get involved in professional organizations early on benefit more from advanced learning opportunities.

“I’ve noticed that students who actively participate in their local ASHP societies tend to feel more prepared for the post-graduate training application process, and they have a good idea of where they want to go because they have often already looked into career opportunities using ASHP resources,” said Dr. Pamulapati.

Moreover, networking through ASHP can give students a competitive edge when applying for a residency, she added. Dr. Pamulapati recalls being a student member of ASHP herself and being told that “pharmacy is a small world.”

“It was not until I was in residency and practicing that I realized how small it truly is, so I recommend to all my students that putting yourself out there early on and building a network helps you develop more quickly and fully as a professional,” said Dr. Pamulapati.

Benefits of ASHP Membership

Lisa Lubsch, Pharm.D., a longstanding ASHP member and clinical professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice at the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Pharmacy, said there are “outstanding benefits to getting involved with ASHP early in pharmacy school.” For example, she said, students can access internship and leadership opportunities, like joining an ASHP committee, advisory group, or council.

Jerika Lam, Pharm.D., pictured with Prashanti Alekal, M.D., provides student pharmacists with experiential education opportunities.

“Becoming a leader enhances your own professional development and can help you find and cultivate a relationship with a mentor,” said Dr. Lubsch, who said she has built her own network of colleagues and collaborators through ASHP.

One of Dr.  Lubsch’s students, who is now completing her P2 year, is a case study in how participation in an organization like ASHP can lead to a cascade of growth opportunities. After taking advantage of the complimentary P1 ASHP membership, the student, in short order, became the P1 liaison for her SSHP and began developing a professional network. The student also completed an ASHP Summer Internship and then became President-elect of the school’s SSHP.

“I’m eager to hear all about her internship and watch her take on more leadership roles,” said Dr. Lubsch.

This student may be exceptionally ambitious, but all P1 students can expect to come across opportunities for growth and leadership if they join ASHP, Dr. Lubsch said.

“Not only will they have the chance to learn about careers in the acute and ambulatory care settings, but the students will also gain an earlier understanding of the residency process and will be better able to prepare for it,” she added.

A Multitude of Networking Opportunities

ASHP member Jerika Lam, Pharm.D., associate professor at Chapman University School of Pharmacy in Irvine, California, hopes P1 students take advantage of the free ASHP membership and get “the same positive experience I had when I was a pharmacy student member of ASHP.”

“An ASHP membership will connect the student to the ASHP community and social network, which is huge!” Dr. Lam enthused.

Dr. Lam is the faculty adviser of her school’s ASHP-SSHP and works with student leaders to organize social and professional functions, including networking events with pharmacy managers from large health systems and pharmacist leaders in the pharmaceutical industry.

“These events always energize Chapman pharmacy students as they move towards their residency and fellowship post-graduate training programs,” said Dr. Lam.

Lauren Pamulapati, Pharm.D., counsels a patient.

Apart from residency-focused activities, Dr. Lam said P1 ASHP members have the chance to engage their political muscles by participating in advocacy campaigns and student-focused activities like the annual Clinical Skills Competition, and they can pursue scholarship opportunities.

These days, Dr. Lam enjoys participating in ASHP’s clinical sections, dropping in on conversations covering a range of topics, from COVID-19 vaccination efforts to drug shortages, and discussions around policies and protocols that affect patient care and safety.

“ASHP has a treasure trove of expert and specialist pharmacists who can be easily connected with through the clinical sections and other forums,” noted Dr. Lam.

Dr. Lam said her own early participation in ASHP’s student forum community informed her career choices and led to opportunities to work with pharmacy leaders across the country. The benefits of networking through ASHP have continued throughout her career, and she regularly learns about models of best practices from other institutions, Dr. Lam said.

“ASHP is a very large organization, but its community is close-knit, and the interactions are professional and personable,” Dr. Lam noted.

The way VCU’s Dr. Pamulapati sees it, joining ASHP is not only beneficial for members, allowing them to enjoy professional and academic perks — it is an act of service to the entire pharmacy profession.

“The future of our profession is in the hands of student pharmacists and new practitioners, and we need them to share their perspectives and help shape policies and create new initiatives,” said Dr. Pamulapati. “I think students should dive feet first into an organization, apply for leadership positions early on and take risks. You may not feel qualified at first but know that your voice is so valued.”

 

By David Wild

April 23, 2021

Hospital Pharmacy Leader Makes Mentorship a Top Priority

Vickie Powell, Pharm.D., M.S., FASHP

WITH A PASSION FOR MENTORSHIP and a dedication to her community and the pharmacy profession, Vickie Powell, Pharm.D., M.S., FASHP, is a pharmacist to emulate. Dr. Powell, site director of pharmacy for New York-Presbyterian Hospital, first thought about a pharmacy career during high school, where she had an interest in and maintained good grades in science. A guest speaker encouraged her and some of her high-achieving classmates to pursue careers in the medical field.

“I did not want to be a doctor because I didn’t like blood,” she said. “I didn’t want to be a dentist. So I thought pharmacy would be the best profession for me because I wouldn’t have to come in contact with all of those things. I love pharmacy. I’m glad I took that path.”

After completing pharmacy school at Xavier University of Louisiana in New Orleans, Dr. Powell got married and moved to New York City’s Harlem neighborhood, where she took a pharmacist position at a drug store downstairs from her apartment. While she found it rewarding working in the community, she wanted to do more. Then one of her customers, a pharmacy director at Harlem Hospital, encouraged her to try hospital pharmacy.

Dr. Powell applied for and was offered a registered pharmacist job with St. Luke’s/Roosevelt Hospital Center. She threw herself into work with enthusiasm, volunteering for everything from backing up computerized pharmacy records to learning all about then-upcoming USP <797> regulations and developing plans for a compliant I.V. room. She soon moved up to an inpatient pharmacy supervisor and developed numerous specialty satellite pharmacies throughout the hospital.

Valuable Mentorship

Because of her expertise, Dr. Powell found herself giving talks to the New York City Society of Health-System Pharmacists. At first, she wasn’t sure how to balance work and being involved in professional pharmacy societies with family life. But her supervisor and mentor, Harvey Maldow, R.Ph., believed it was so important she participate that he told Dr. Powell’s husband that he had to watch their young children while she attended meetings. She became the second African-American president of the group.

During her acceptance speech, Dr. Powell discussed mentoring and her philosophy of “Each one, teach one,” based on every mentee helping pull up someone behind them. The vice president of pharmacy at New York-Presbyterian Hospital was impressed and approached her about a director job. Maldow encouraged her to apply.

Today, Dr. Powell oversees pharmacy operations for three of the health system’s 11 hospitals, and oversees around 600 pharmacy employees. Besides her work tasks, Powell continues to make mentoring a priority, promoting good communication skills and lifelong education. She’s proud to have encouraged many technicians to become pharmacists.

“We meet on a regular basis because I don’t want to just tell people something and then hope they’ll follow it through; I try to work with them one-on-one to help them achieve whatever goals we’ve set out for them,” she said.

Community Service

Dr. Powell also maintains close ties to her community, serving for many years as a Sunday school teacher and member of the health committee at her church. Powell brings in guest speakers on topics important to their membership, such as hypertension and diabetes. One speaker, celebrity cardiothoracic surgeon Mehmet Oz (TV’s “Dr. Oz”), awarded free gym memberships to a few audience members. She also has been a special events coordinator for the Harlem Little League. More recently, Powell supervised a COVID-19 vaccine clinic at her church run by her hospital.

“I try to do a lot of things to help our community, and I do whatever I can to propel the practice of pharmacy,” she said. To that end, Dr. Powell serves on the Board of Directors for Long Island University’s College of Pharmacy and has given guest lectures at Touro College of Pharmacy. In 2009, she was the first African-American president of the New York State Council of Health-System Pharmacists.

ASHP Leadership       

Dr. Powell also has been very active in ASHP, serving over the years as a delegate as well as on several committees, including the Council on Education and Workforce Development and the Committee on Nominations. In 2020, Dr. Powell was honored to be invited to join ASHP’s Task Force on Racial Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

Dr. Powell and her colleagues celebrate receiving the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

“Our social and justice systems are broken, and conscious and unconscious racism exists,” she said. “We talked a lot about institutional racism, which sometimes has been embedded as a normal practice within a society or organization. We made some changes in the structure of how things will be done to assure equity for all members. I don’t think people realize how institutional racism can lead to such issues as discrimination in employment, health care, and even with access to the [COVID-19] vaccine.”

The group suggested some changes to ASHP policies, Dr. Powell said, one being that a person can only run for a board position if they had just been a delegate. “That eliminates a lot of people,” she said. The group recommended that members did not have to have delegate experience to run for a board office. They also changed governance so the chair of the house of delegates no longer presides over the nominations committee, which could be a conflict of interest.

“We opened it up so that more people would have the opportunity to run for office,” she said. “We’re going to make mentoring a big part of the process.”

Dr. Powell stands out because of her intelligence, her mentorship, her compassion, and her ability to listen to people and understand their needs, Maldow noted.

“She’s one of the best people I ever worked with in terms of how she managed both down and up, and the staff adored her,” he said. “When I look at the people I mentored in my career, she’s on the top in how successful she has been, and it’s a credit to her, not me. The only thing I take credit for is being able to identify her potential. She’s a great health-system pharmacist and someone people should model themselves after.”

 

By Karen Blum

November 13, 2020

Pharmacists Take the Lead in Providing Vaping Interventions

Kimberly Novak, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCPPS, FPPA, with PGY2 residents Becca Wytiaz and Mara Rubin.

AN INCREASE IN THE USE OF E-CIGARETTES AMONG adolescents in the U.S. is erasing recent progress in reducing overall tobacco use in this population, according to alarming statistics from the Centers for Disease Control. Some 27.5% of high schoolers and 10.5% of middle schoolers reported current use of e-cigarettes, the CDC reported in a recent issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, creating an immense opportunity for pharmacists to get involved.

Vaping and COVID-19

In 2019, there was a surge in E-cigarette or vaping product use-associate lung injury (EVALI) which was particularly noted in adolescents and young adults. Interestingly, there was an observed decrease in EVALI cases early in 2020, explained Kimberly Novak, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCPPS, FPPA, an advanced patient care pharmacist in pediatric and adult cystic fibrosis at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. “This was originally attributed to increased public awareness of vaping and strategies aimed at reducing marketing and access of flavored vaping products of preferred by this population,” said Dr. Novak. “However, this decrease also corresponded with the initial surge in COVID-19 cases and many state-mandated stay-at-home rules as well as increased implementation of work-from-home and virtual school policies.”

As many of these policies were loosened in the summer months, health care practitioners have noted an increase again in EVALI cases, perhaps due to less supervision as parents returned to onsite work, she added.

Pharmacist roles

In general, e-cigarette usage in adolescents “has blown up among this population way more than people suspected, particularly because it’s so easy to hide, and it doesn’t smell,” said Dr. Novak. “This snuck up on us as a society with very little regulation, and now we’re working backward, trying to catch up to this epidemic that got out of the bag before we got a hold on it.”

Kyle Mays, Pharm.D., BCPPS, discusses cessation options with a teenage patient.

Pharmacists can play several important roles in patient care regarding e-cigarette usage and related lung injuries, said Dr. Novak, an ASHP member since 1998. In teaching hospitals like hers, pharmacists provide continuity where attending physicians and residents may change over. They also can monitor trends in nicotine usage, and, because patients view pharmacists differently than their physicians, they may share more information about medication histories with them.

Typical agents prescribed to help curb nicotine cravings, like varenicline (Chantix) and bupropion (Zyban, Wellbutrin), are not indicated for people under the age of 18, noted Justin Reinert, Pharm.D., BCCCP, a clinical assistant professor at the Ben and Maytee Fisch College of Pharmacy at the University of Texas at Tyler. This doesn’t mean physicians aren’t prescribing them for this population, he said, but pharmacists can employ motivational interviewing techniques and assess patients’ readiness to change.

Interventions to reduce usage

In addition, pharmacists can use their medication expert hat to advise primary care teams on different vaping products used by teens, said Kyle Mays, Pharm.D., BCPPS, a critical care pharmacist with SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital in St. Louis. When his hospital saw a recent surge in illnesses among patients using THC-related vaping compounds, some of his colleagues weren’t aware these products were linked to lung injuries because of the solvents and vitamin E they contained. If patients are admitted with severe lung illnesses and are intubated and can’t speak, Dr. Mays and colleagues play detective, eliminating potential causes or ordering urine toxicology screens.

Justin Reinert, Pharm.D., BCCCP

In an effort to address e-cigarette usage in his area, Dr. Reinert is directing a two-fold intervention. Pharmacists and doctoral pharmacy students are providing educational in-services and assemblies in local schools, as well as surveying high school students about their use of nicotine products. Then, beginning this fall, pharmacy students will provide nicotine cessation programs in schools, targeted to high schoolers who may have violated a tobacco or nicotine use policy.

Among over 100 students they surveyed so far, about 78% reported using these products, said Dr. Reinert, an ASHP member since 2013. “Students are primarily into vaping, but it’s important to be cognizant of other things out there,” he noted. “Kids are still smoking cigarettes, they’re still using cigar wrappers for marijuana. The addictive component of the devices remains nicotine.”

Dr. Reinert tries to use shock value to educate the students, asking how many of them who drive and pump gas would stick the gas nozzle into their mouths and inhale. “There are components in these vaping cartridges that are identical to components of unleaded gasoline—lead, mercury, nickel, cadmium and heavy metals, etc.,” he said. “The students have no idea, which is terrible, but it also highlights the need for targeted education at this age group, which I think pharmacists are uniquely positioned to accomplish.”

Strategies for pharmacists    

The pharmacists offered advice on working with adolescent patients and their families:

  • Take an objective yet compassionate stance. “Don’t tell them they’re [doing something] wrong,” Dr. Novak said, as that can cause the patient to shut down and not disclose information. Instead, acknowledge that they may have made an unhealthy choice but keep the lines of communication open. “Your job is to treat the patient and make them better, not ridicule what they were doing that brought them in,” added Dr. Mays, an ASHP member for the past 10 years.
  • Put your message in terms relative to adolescents. Dr. Reinert’s cessation curriculum discusses the financial, health and psychosocial ramifications of nicotine use at a level appropriate for adolescents, not adults or younger children.
  • Offer resources for quitting. Educate adolescents that, similar to cigarettes, it’s hard to quit cold turkey, Dr. Mays noted. Encourage them to seek appropriate help through their pediatrician or another primary care provider, and work with them to develop a plan.
  • Try to talk to the patients without their parents. Patients may not want to fully admit to using these products, especially if their parents are present, Dr. Mays said.
  • Keep current on your knowledge. People tend to think JUUL devices are the e-cigarette of choice for teens, but new ones are popping up all the time, said Dr. Mays. “You have to stay trendy with what’s going on in a teenager’s mind,” he added.

Patient impact

Vaping devices essentially are nebulizers that deliver a drug, Dr. Novak said. But they haven’t yet been adequately studied to determine what products should go in them, what the safety margins are, or if chemicals put into them are altered by heat that the devices generate. Hopefully, with time, she said, the medical community will learn better safety information about these devices and their related products.

Meanwhile, pharmacists should stay involved, such as working with ASHP to advocate for more regulation around vaping and nicotine products. “The more we can do this on an individual level, whether in our own institutions, providing education or working with poison centers, we can make a pretty positive impact wherever our patients are,” said Dr. Novak.

 

By Karen Blum

 

# # #

October 29, 2020

Virginia Mason Kirkland Medical Center Wins ASHP Board of Directors’ Award of Excellence

AN EFFICIENT PRACTICE WORKFLOW, allowing pharmacists and other clinicians to perform at the top of their licensure, and a culture of respect are three of the principles rooted at Virginia Mason Kirkland Medical Center in Washington. These factors have contributed to high job satisfaction among clinicians and helped the medical center become one of two recipients of the 2020 ASHP Board of Directors’ Award of Excellence.

Promoting Well-being

Richard Furlong, M.D

“The Virginia Mason Kirkland Medical Center implemented initiatives to support well-being and resilience and reduce burnout for its patient care providers,” ASHP said in a formal announcement. “These initiatives have been selected by the National Academy of Medicine to promote pharmacists as part of an interprofessional team to address clinician burnout and promote resilience.”

The medical center is one of nine locations for the Virginia Mason Health System, each with one or more primary care pharmacists. The Kirkland location is an outpatient clinic with 30 full-time clinicians, including two pharmacists, which since 2002, has embraced a team-based structure built around professional development and workflow optimization.

“This work, like almost all process improvement at Virginia Mason, leveraged our management method called Virginia Mason Production System (VMPS), modeled after the Toyota production system. It optimizes care delivery by eliminating waste, standardizing processes, and spreading the work to the right operators,” said Richard Furlong, M.D., section head and medical director of the center.

Promoting Engagement, Contentment

Well-being is promoted in several ways. One is the physical structure. The building is set up in two concentric circles. The inner ring has exam rooms while the outer ring has clinician workstations. Patients are brought immediately to an exam room when they arrive; there are no waiting rooms. Integrated care teams include pharmacists, advanced registered nurse providers, physician assistants, physicians, and medical assistants who able to move among the teams as needed. All employees are encouraged to submit ideas on improving processes, with suggestions reviewed weekly by leadership. Leaders promote a culture of engagement, teamwork, and respect for people, which includes making time for professional development.

Contentment is also promoted through pharmacists and other clinicians working to the full extent of their education and training systemwide.

“When pharmacists and other teammates help, and the work is evenly spread, it creates a collegial atmosphere that engages people and reduces burnout,” Dr. Furlong said. Pharmacists in the state have provider status and can bill for medication management appointments. They see some of their own patients between provider visits, answer all patient questions about medication, and have the authority to make changes to therapy.

Expanding Pharmacist Roles

In the early days, the pharmacist’s role was limited to anticoagulation management, noted Dr. Furlong. The team then started to look at other clinical conditions that could use pharmacists’ help, such as lipids and hypertension. They created a Heart Attack and Stroke Prevention clinic.

“We convinced our doctors that it was in everyone’s best interest to refer our patients for lipids and hypertension management to our pharmacists,” he said. It didn’t take long for data to accumulate, indicating their quality metrics were higher than other clinics not employing pharmacist management, so they continue to expand the pharmacists’ role.

Roger Woolf, Pharm.D.

Now, the health system’s 22 clinical pharmacists—all board-certified in ambulatory care— manage patients in additional areas such as chronic opioid therapy, hyperlipidemia, behavioral health management, anemia management, and smoking cessation. Practicing under the state’s collaborative drug therapy agreement, pharmacists can manage multiple conditions at once, easing provider workload by helping with direct and indirect patient care, said Jenny Park, Pharm.D., BCACP, a clinical pharmacist with the medical center.

“We refer to it as skill task alignment,” said Roger Woolf, Pharm.D., administrative director and chief pharmacy officer for the Virginia Mason Health System, of the team-based care model. “Our pharmacists manage drug therapy. They can prescribe, they can change doses, order labs and other diagnostics to ensure the patient’s medications are being used with the right intent or getting the desired outcomes. If you’ve got a full spectrum of patients coming in, some of whom need in the weeds medication management, who’s the best person? The majority of the time, that’s going to be the pharmacist.”

Adds Dr. Furlong, “What makes people feel engaged is not just giving a pat on the back or a reward, because eventually, if the work they’re doing is not meaningful, that reward will feel hollow. You respect people when you help them to develop professionally and to work at the top of their abilities.”

Increased Job Satisfaction

Jenny Park, Pharm.D., BCACP

Through this process, pharmacists have been able to help the health system achieve certain quality measures, Dr. Park said. For example, a few years ago, Washington State had depression management rates of less than 40%. Investigating, Dr. Park and colleagues discovered that some patients would abruptly stop their medications because of side effects or because they felt the drugs weren’t working fast enough. The health system began a process through which pharmacists would follow up with any patient started on medication for anxiety or depression after two weeks through a telehealth visit to assess side effects or reassure them to allow more time. From there, they reassess every six weeks, noting improvements in medication adherence and patient-reported outcomes.

The Kirkland workday also incorporates mandatory pauses. Pharmacists see patients for 20- to 40-minute visits throughout the day. They have one built-in 20-minute pause in the mornings and one in the afternoons that they can use to catch up on documentation or other indirect patient care tasks without feeling frenzied. Additionally, leadership supports activities like team discussions on being inclusive and honoring diversity, and quarterly workshops about empathetic communication skills. A Joy at Work team arranges outings to bowling alleys or potluck meals.

With all of these items in place, job satisfaction has been high, Dr. Furlong said. In a 2018 employee satisfaction survey, 93% of clinicians reported they were content or engaged.

Winning the ASHP award has been gratifying, he said. “It feels good, especially for the pharmacists who do so much work, to share this award with them.”

“I love my job, I love my profession, and I love bragging about Virginia Mason and sharing all that I do,” Dr. Park added. “To be able to do that on a bigger level nationally is amazing. The possibilities are endless for what pharmacists can do.”

Drs. Furlong and Park were part of a team that presented information on their model through a national webinar in January sponsored by the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). ASHP is an original sponsor of the NAM Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience and is proud to represent pharmacy in interprofessional efforts to address the critical workforce and patient care issue of well-being and resilience.

By Karen Blum

 

# # #

October 19, 2020

ASHP Members Highlight the Value of Board Certification

Katie Hughes, Pharm.D., BCPPS

WHEN SNEHAL BHATT, PHARM.D., BCPS, was going through pharmacy school and residency training, he noticed that the pharmacists and mentors he looked up to most all were board certified. So when he completed his training in 2001, he pursued his board certification in pharmacotherapy to achieve expertise in pharmacy practice and emulate those who inspired him.

Professional benefits

Dr. Bhatt, a clinical pharmacist in cardiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and an ASHP member since 1999, said this distinction comes in handy on a daily basis.

“Most of my patients have a variety of other disease states and comorbidities that aren’t necessarily cardiology-related, and that’s an area where I have just as important an impact in patient care,” said Dr. Bhatt, who also is a professor of pharmacy practice at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences University. “While I certainly help with recommending medications for patients’ primary cardiovascular problems, I often find myself having to help the team with non-cardiovascular medications, too. Being well-rounded as a pharmacist and well-versed in a variety of drug therapy options outside of your specialty is essential to pharmacy practice.”

Being well-versed in your field is just one of the professional benefits pharmacists can reap from becoming board-certified, said Angela Bingham, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCNSP, BCCCP, FASPEN,  an associate professor of clinical pharmacy at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. She is also a clinical pharmacist in the medical/surgical intensive care units at Cooper University Hospital, in Camden, N.J.

Angela Bingham, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCNSP, BCCCP, FASPEN

She and other pharmacists enjoy the validation of their clinical knowledge and competency beyond licensing requirements, she says. There also can be financial incentives related to salary, promotions, and new practice opportunities that emerge. With a seed grant from the Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS), Dr. Bingham and one of her residents are investigating the prevalence and value of board certification among pharmacy practice faculty at colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States. A previous survey indicated that one of the most important benefits identified by participants was gaining personal satisfaction by accomplishing professional goals that were important to them.

Advanced practice opportunities

Dr. Bingham is board certified in three areas: pharmacotherapy, nutrition support, and critical care, and now works with ASHP on the critical care review and recertification programs. She first pursued pharmacotherapy board certification as a PGY-2 critical care pharmacy resident, then pursued certification in nutrition support and in critical care as those emerged as areas of passion and specialization for her after she completed a residency.

“It really impressed me that board certification is a gold standard for determining which pharmacists are qualified to contribute to advanced practice roles,” said Dr. Bingham, an ASHP member for 14 years. “I also was impressed by the rigorous processes BPS uses to help ensure that board certified pharmacists are trained to meet the expectations of interprofessional health care teams and saw specialization as an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. I was drawn to the complex, evolving nature of critically ill patients and the team structure of care within the ICU environment, which led me down this path.”

Improving confidence and becoming an expert in pediatric care inspired Katie Hughes, Pharm.D., BCPPS, to pursue board certification in pediatric pharmacy. Dr. Hughes had a long interest in working with children but found that she needed much more information during a pediatrics rotation in pharmacy school.

“It was overwhelming from a clinical and emotional/social perspective,” said Dr. Hughes, who now works with the pediatric ICU at Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University in Indianapolis, as well as the burn and rehabilitation units. “I realized that a lot of the kids we were seeing then weren’t the textbook kids we looked at in school. They were different sizes, had different volumes of distribution, had different clearance rates, their organs were totally different, and we didn’t have black and white guidelines to tell us what to do.”

Dr. Hughes, an ASHP member since 2012, said she did appreciate helping patients through their illnesses and watching their incredible ability to bounce back and recover. When BPS introduced the pediatrics pharmacy board certification during her PGY-2 year, she jumped on it. She attended ASHP’s board prep meeting as part of her training. Now, Dr. Hughes helps ASHP develop curricula for its board recertification.

“The medical profession has some imposter syndrome, and I don’t think that’s uncommon in pharmacy either,” she said. “You want to make sure you know what you’re doing, and sometimes you’re hesitant because you don’t have that confidence. The board certification helped me with that, and making sure I was taking the best care of patients I could.”

Certification offerings

BPS recognizes 14 pharmacy specialties, of which ASHP has available resources, including review courses, for nine currently: Ambulatory care pharmacy, critical care pharmacy, cardiology pharmacy, compounded sterile preparations pharmacy, geriatric pharmacy, infectious diseases pharmacy, oncology pharmacy, pediatric pharmacy, and pharmacotherapy. Soon, ASHP and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) will offer a review package for the transplant pharmacist exam, including an online review course and practice exam.

ASHP and ACCP also partner to provide resources for the Ambulatory Care, Cardiology, Geriatric, Infectious Diseases, and Oncology specialties.

Whether to pursue board certification always will be a personal decision, Dr. Bhatt said. There are so many specialty areas now board-certified that it allows every practitioner to find their own home.

“For anyone who really has a desire to stay as advanced in their practice, and as broad-based and up-to-date as you can, board certification is one of the best ways to do so because it’s a very structured environment, and you know you’re getting high-quality education from your peers in terms of what matters for pharmacy practice,” he said.

ASHP programs

Dr. Bhatt originally had to make his own study guides from reading textbook chapters, guidelines, and primary literature. But more recently, while pursuing recertification, he has taken advantage of ASHP’s continuing education programs. Many of ASHP’s activities offer dual recertification credit for pharmacists with more than one specialty credential.

“There are several ways I can get board certification credits through ASHP throughout the year,” he said. “It allows us to fit those activities into our schedules in a convenient fashion so we can maintain our board certification without being intrusive to our day-to-day practices or family lives.”

Board certification is “certainly a commitment that can’t be taken lightly,” added Dr. Bingham. “But it can ultimately be very professionally rewarding.”

By Karen Blum

# # #

March 26, 2020

Update on ASHP Resources and Efforts to Help Combat COVID-19

Dear Colleagues,

Paul W. Abramowitz, Pharm.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), FASHP

I WANT TO CONTINUE TO UPDATE YOU on our most recent efforts on your behalf to face the rapidly evolving impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

New COVID-19 Resources for All

ASHP continues to work to create up-to-date, evidence-based tools and provide the most current resources that you can trust to support your work on the front lines of patient care.

ASHP, through the leadership of our drug information staff in AHFS, created an evidence table to help practitioners better understand current approaches related to the proposed treatment and care of patients with COVID-19. ASHP’s Assessment of Evidence for COVID-19-Related Treatments also includes an assessment of the evidence around supportive treatments and selected chronic medications that may be used in this population.

This resource provides a concise summary – for pharmacists, physicians, and other health professionals – of published studies related to the use of hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, and remdesivir and other antivirals in the treatment of people with COVID-19. We are updating this document regularly as new evidence becomes available.

We have made this valuable resource available for free to everyone, both domestically and internationally. We encourage you to share it with anyone who you believe would benefit from it, including your colleagues in medicine, nursing, state and local government, and others.

Earlier this week, we published our newest resource, supporting the stewardship of off-label treatments for COVID-19. Inappropriate prescribing can lead to an inadequate supply of medications for those who need them most. Stockpiling and hoarding may also create or exacerbate shortages. This resource was created to support the interprofessional care team as it makes decisions about the off-label use of medications for confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases, allowing clinicians to weigh supporting evidence, risks, and potential benefits.

Yesterday we issued a joint statement with the American Medical Association and the American Pharmacists Association addressing the inappropriate ordering, prescribing, or dispensing of medications to treat COVID-19. The statement cautions about the lack of strong evidence for the off-label use of medications for COVID-19 as well as stockpiling medications, and opposes the prophylactic prescribing of medications currently identified as potential treatments for COVID-19.

You can find the full text of the joint statement, tools, and many other resources on ASHP’s COVID-19 Resource Center, which is updated frequently with the latest information and news. Our resources, along with many other practice and educational tools on ashp.org, are now open access and available to all healthcare professionals. We encourage you to share these materials with anyone who may need them in your network and community. 

Personal Protective Equipment Survey

ASHP is closely monitoring personal protective equipment (PPE) shortages that we know are affecting many of our members and other healthcare providers. We are conducting a bi-weekly survey to obtain an updated status of supplies and the availability of medical masks, including surgical masks, N-95 respirators, or mask alternatives currently being used in healthcare settings.

According to the results of our first survey, 15% of respondents indicated either a major or moderate disruption in the availability of medical masks, and over half indicated their vendor is allocating supplies of PPE. ASHP has been in contact with The Joint Commission, United States Pharmacopeia, and other experts and stakeholders to call attention to the critical nature of some PPE supplies and to develop guidance for compounding pharmacies. The United States Pharmacopeia Compounding Expert Committee has developed recommendations in response to shortages of garb and PPE for sterile compounding.

The second ASHP PPE survey is currently in the field, and we will continue to update you on the results.

ASHP Connect Community

Last week ASHP launched the COVID-19 Connect Community. ASHP members — and any healthcare provider — can use this resource to ask questions, receive answers, share experiences, post resources, receive updates, and learn best practices to support your patients and each other. We will also post updates about new resources, guidance documents, news, and announcements to this community. I encourage you to join your healthcare colleagues in the new ASHP Connect Community.

ASHP Advocacy Efforts

Finally, I’m pleased to share with you that several of ASHP’s recommendations to mitigate the risks that drug shortages pose to patients and the healthcare system were included in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act that Congress voted to advance yesterday. The legislation, passed unanimously in the Senate, includes five key drug shortages provisions, including:

  1. Prioritizing reviews of drug applications, including expediting inspections and reviews for abbreviated new drug applications
  2. Mandatory manufacturer reporting of some drug shortage information that is currently voluntary
  3. Expansion of current manufacturer reporting requirements to include interruptions or disruptions of a drug’s active pharmaceutical ingredient’s availability
  4. Requiring manufacturers to develop risk management and redundancy plans for their supply chains
  5. Including medical devices in shortage reporting requirements during a public health emergency

While the CARES Act provides significant resources to assist hospitals in responding to COVID-19, unfortunately, pharmacist provider status in Medicare, which is language that we have been working to include, is not in this legislation. Please know that we will continue to actively advocate for Congress to recognize pharmacists as providers in the Medicare program, including and beyond the current pandemic.

ASHP is here to support you in every way we can during this public health emergency. We will continue to bring you new and updated resources to meet your evolving needs and advocate on your behalf. Thank you for being a member of ASHP and for everything that you are doing for your patients and our profession during this pandemic.

Sincerely,

Paul

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress